The stove-in chest: a complex flail chest injury (2023)

ScienceDirect

RegisterSign in

ViewPDF

  • Access throughyour institution

Article preview

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Section snippets
  • References (10)
  • Cited by (3)
  • Recommended articles (6)

Injury

Volume 35, Issue 5,

May 2004

, Pages 490-493

Author links open overlay panelRogerBloomeraPersonKeithWillettbIanPallisterc

(Video) Chest Trauma: Flail Chest

Abstract

The stove-in chest is a rare form of flail chest in which there is collapse of a segment of the chest wall, associated with a high immediate mortality. A 65-year-old male pedestrian was admitted with severe chest pain and dyspnoea, after being struck by a car. The initial chest radiograph demonstrated multiple right-sided rib fractures and pulmonary contusion. His gas exchange was good, and after pain relief via an epidural catheter was achieved, an intercostal drain was inserted into the right hemi-thorax. Clinically apparent deformation of the chest then occurred. A further chest radiograph confirmed the stove-in chest. The patient remained well initially, but on day 5 he deteriorated precipitously with respiratory failure, and signs of systemic sepsis. He died despite maximal ventilatory and inotropic support on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Post-mortem examination demonstrated congested, oedematous lungs with a right-sided empyema. The management of complex flail chest injuries requires treatment to be tailored to the individual patient. Early ventilatory support, despite good gas exchange, may have closed down the pleural space prevented the empyema. Prophylactic ventilation and possibly surgical stabilisation of the chest wall should be considered early in the course of admission, even when the conventional parameters to indicate ventilation are not met.

Introduction

The stove-in chest is a subtype of flail chest in which there is a depression or collapse of a segment of the chest wall, usually as the result of a direct blow.7 Severe chest injury of this type is often an important factor in deaths occurring at the scene of injury.6 Consequently the injury is seen rarely in hospital, and the experience gained from the case presented suggests that it cannot be effectively managed simply as a flail chest.

Section snippets

Case report

A 65-year-old male pedestrian was struck by a motor vehicle at approximately 40m/h. He was fully conscious on arrival at the hospital, and complaining of severe right-sided chest pain. He was haemodynamically stable (BP 170/90mmHg, HR 86min−1, RR 36min−1, SaO2 96% on 15l O2 by reservoir mask). The initial chest radiograph demonstrated multiple depressed right-sided rib fractures posteriorly, with evidence of pulmonary contusion (Figure 1). His associated injuries were fractures of the right

Discussion

There has been controversy regarding the most effective way to treat severe blunt chest trauma for many years. The goals of pain relief, optimisation of gas exchange and the prevention of secondary sepsis can be approached in one of the three ways:

1.

Conservative treatment with effective analgesia, aggressive chest physiotherapy and close observation of respiratory function.

2.

Pneumatic stabilisation with continuous positive airways pressure ventilation (CPAP) and/or intermittent mandatory

Conclusion

The stove-in chest is a rare subtype of the complex flail chest. In spite of the loss of lung volume, adequate gas exchange was maintained in this patient. Prophylactic ventilation and possibly surgical stabilisation of the chest wall should be considered early in the course of the patient’s admission, even when the conventional criteria to indicate ventilation are not fulfilled.

References (10)

  • G Voggenreiter et al.Operative chest wall stabilization in flail chest-outcomes of patients with or without pulmonary contusion

    J. Am. Coll. Surg.

    (1998)

  • R.C Harruff et al.Analysis of circumstances and injuries in 217 pedestrian traffic fatalities

    Accid. Anal. Prev.

    (1998)

    (Video) Flail Chest Mnemonic

  • P Carbognani et al.A technical proposal for the complex flail chest

    Ann. Thorac. Surg.

    (2000)

  • Z Ahmed et al.Management of flail chest injury: internal fixation versus endotracheal intubation and ventilation

    J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.

    (1995)

  • G.M Actis Dato et al.

    Surgical management of flail chest

    Ann. Thorac. Surg.

    (1999)

There are more references available in the full text version of this article.

Recommended articles (6)

  • Research article

    Identifying play characteristics of pre-school children with developmental coordination disorder via parental questionnaires

    Human Movement Science, Volume 53, 2017, pp. 5-15

    Motor coordination deficits that characterize children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) affect their quality of participation. The aim of the current study was to identify play characteristics of young children with DCD, compared to those of children with typical development in three dimensions: activity and participation, environmental factors and children’s impairments.

    Sixty-four children, aged four to six years, participated. Thirty were diagnosed as having DCD; the remaining 34 children were age, gender and socioeconomic level matched controls with typical development. The children were evaluated by the M-ABC. In addition, their parents completed a demographic questionnaire, the Children’s Activity Scale for Parents (CHAS-P), the Children’s Leisure Assessment Scale for preschoolers (CLASS-Pre), and My Child’s Play Questionnaire (MCP).

    Children with DCD performed significantly poorer in each of the four play activity and participation domains: variety, frequency, sociability, and preference (CLASS-Pre). Furthermore, their environmental characteristics were significantly different (MCP). They displayed significantly inferior performance (impairments) in interpersonal interaction and executive functioning during play, in comparison to controls (MCP). Moreover, the children’s motor and executive control as reflected in their daily function as well as their activities of daily living (ADL) performance level, contributed to the prediction of their global play participation.

    The results indicate that the use of both the CLASS-Pre and the MCP questionnaires enables the identification of unique play characteristics of pre-school children with DCD via parents’ reports. A better insight into these characteristics may contribute to theoretical knowledge and clinical practice to improve the children’s daily participation.

    (Video) Flail Chest with Paradoxical Motion | NEJM
  • Research article

    Inconsistent shock advisories for monomorphic VT and Torsade de Pointes – A prospective experimental study on AEDs and defibrillators

    Resuscitation, Volume 92, 2015, pp. 137-140

    Cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac arrest are the leading causes of death in the United States. Early defibrillation is key to successful resuscitation for patients who experience shockable rhythms during a cardiac arrest. It is therefore vital that the shock advisory of AEDs (automated external defibrillators) or defibrillators in AED mode be reliable and appropriate. The goal of this study was to better understand the performance of multiple lay-rescuer and hospital professional defibrillators in AED mode in their analysis of ventricular arrhythmias. The measurable objectives of this study sought to quantify:

    1.

    No shock advisory for sinus rhythms at any rate.

    2.

    Recognition and shock advisory for ventricular fibrillation (VF).

    3.

    Recognition and shock advisory for monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT).

    4.

    Recognition and shock advisory for Torsades de Pointes (TdP).

    This is a prospective evaluation of two AEDs and four semi-automatic, hospital professional defibrillators. This study represents post-marketing evaluation of FDA approved devices. Each defibrillator was connected to multiple rhythm simulators and presented with simulated ECG waveforms 20 consecutive times at various rates when possible.

    All four defibrillators and both AEDs tested consistently recognized normal sinus rhythm (NSR) from all rhythm sources, and did not recommend a shock for NSR at any rate (from 80 to 220bpm). All four defibrillators and both AEDs recognized VF from all rhythm sources tested and recommended a shock 100% of the time. Variations were found in the shock advisory rates among defibrillators when testing simulated VT heart rates at or below 150bpm. One AED tested did not consistently advise a shock for monomorphic VT or TdP at any tested rate.

    Lay-rescuer AEDs and professional hospital defibrillators tested in AED mode did not reliably recommend a shock for sustained monomorphic VT or TdP at certain rates, despite the fact that it is a critical component of the currently recommended treatment. These findings require further examination of the risk benefit analysis of shocking or not shocking rhythms such as TdP or pulseless VT.

  • Research article

    PCL-retaining versus PCL-substituting TKR – Outcome assessment based on the “forgotten joint score”

    Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma, Volume 6, Issue 4, 2015, pp. 236-239

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retention or sacrifice figures prominently among the current controversies in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Even though biomechanical advantages and disadvantages have been claimed for each type of TKA, clinical studies have not shown significant differences in the outcomes.

    (Video) Spotting a flail chest 🫁

    In this retrospective study, the recently introduced “forgotten joint score” (FJS) was used to assess whether any differences exist between the two types of total knee replacement (TKR). FJ scores of 169 patients with PCL-retaining TKA and 178 patients with PCL sacrificing were obtained. The mean follow-up period was 3.5 years and the minimum follow-up period was 2.5 years.

    Both groups showed high FJ scores indicating that majority of the patients were oblivious to the presence of the artificial joint during daily activities. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean FJ scores of the two groups. Scores of subsets based on gender, age and unilateral and bilateral TKR also did not show significant differences.

    Since there are no clinically important differences between the two types of TKR, the choice of the TKA should be based on surgeon preferences and training and local conditions of the knee. Patient-reported outcomes appear to be similar regardless of the choice of TKA. Further prospective studies and validation of FJS outcomes with those of other questionnaires are essential to confirm the absence of differences between PCL retention and sacrifice.

  • Research article

    Selective non-operative management of stab wounds to the posterior abdomen is safe: the Pietermaritzburg experience

    Injury, Volume 46, Issue 9, 2015, pp. 1753-1758

    The selective non-operative management (SNOM) of stab injuries of the anterior abdomen is well established, but its application to the posterior abdomen remains controversial.

    A retrospective review of 1013 patients was undertaken at a major trauma service in South Africa over a five-year period.

    Ninety per cent of patients were males, and the mean age was 25 years. The mean time from injury to presentation was 4h and 73% of all injuries were inflicted by knives. A total of 9% (93) of patients required a laparotomy [Group A] and 82% (833) were successfully observed without the need for operative intervention [Group B]. CT imaging was performed on 52 patients (5%) who had haematuria [Group C], 25 (3%) who had neurological deficits [Group D], and 10 (1%) with retained weapon injuries [Group E]. The accuracy of physical examination for identifying the presence of organ injury was 88%. All observed patients who required laparotomy declared themselves within 24h. There were no mortalities as direct result of our current management protocol.

    Selective management based on active clinical observation and serial physical examination is safe, and when coupled with the judicious use of advanced imaging, is a prudent and reliable approach in a resource constrained environment.

  • Research article

    Recurrent Hematuria Caused by Nutcracker Syndrome

    Annals of Vascular Surgery, Volume 28, Issue 4, 2014, pp. 1036.e15-1036.e19

    A 26-year-old woman presented to the emergency department complaining of left flank pain, and proteinuria and hematuria were detected during urinalysis. A renal ultrasound did not reveal any disorder, and after performing a computed tomography angiography scan, compression of the left renal vein between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta was seen. This compression is known as Nutcracker syndrome. From among the different treatment options available, it was decided, with patient consensus, to use open surgical management, performing a transposition of the left renal vein to a more distal level in the inferior vena cava. The immediate postoperative care progressed without complications and the symptoms resolved; after 1 year of surveillance, the patient continues to be asymptomatic. Nutcracker syndrome is a rare phenomenon, with few cases described. There are different therapeutic options for the treatment of Nutcracker syndrome, such as open surgery, endovascular treatment, or conservative treatment; because of the low prevalence of this syndrome, there are no sufficiently large series at present or with the necessary long-term surveillance to decide on the most suitable treatment. Distal transposition of the left renal vein in the inferior cava vein has proved to offer good long-term results, and this option offers a higher chance of resolution without the need for as many postsurgery controls as would be required with endovascular treatment.

  • Research article

    Penetrating blast injury involving maxilla to infratemporal fossa: An unusual wounding mechanism following heavy tractor wheel explosion

    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Volume 28, Issue 3, 2016, pp. 239-243

    Although most significant maxillofacial injuries are the result of blunt trauma, solitary penetrating facial injuries with retained foreign bodies occur, and can be particularly difficult to manage, since multiple vital structures are concentrated in a relatively small anatomic area. When penetrating facial injuries occur, they are usually caused by low-velocity gunshots, falls, criminal assaults, occupational, or traffic accidents. Occasionally, however, maxillofacial surgeons may be encountered with penetrating facial injuries caused by unusual etiologies. Blast injuries to the face owing to tire or metal rim fragments explosion provide a specific example of such a traumatic event. In addition to initial pressure wave which can produce severe overpressure barotrauma, an exploding wheel tire assemblies or objects in the close tire vicinity may act as a high-speed secondary projectile that can produce serious or even fatal penetrating injuries to the person facing the wheel. This report documents solitary heavy tractor tire blast-induced penetrating injury caused by metallic blunt object (combination pliers) firmly impacted in the right maxillary sinus. The unusual wounding mechanism of this injury is highlighted and the principles in the management of such a case are emphasized.

    (Video) Flail Chest - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

View full text

Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

FAQs

What is stove-in chest? ›

The stove-in chest is a rare form of flail chest in which there is collapse of a segment of the chest wall, associated with a high immediate mortality. A 65-year-old male pedestrian was admitted with severe chest pain and dyspnoea, after being struck by a car.

What is the first aid treatment for a flail chest? ›

How to Treat:
  1. Stabilize the flail chest.
  2. Use a hard pad to put pressure on the flail segment. Holding the flail segment in place keeps it from moving in an opposite direction as the surrounding muscle and bone. ...
  3. This injury requires emergency medical treatment.

What is a flail chest injury? ›

Flail chest — defined as two or more contiguous rib fractures with two or more breaks per rib — is one of the most serious of these injuries and is often associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. It occurs when a portion of the chest wall is destabilized, usually from severe blunt force trauma.

How do you position a patient with flail chest? ›

Consider lying the patient on the side of a flail to allow splinting and analgesia. In an isolated chest injury the ideal position is sitting up. Patients self‐splinting using their own chest muscles will be reduced if they lay flat. Avoid long periods positioned supine on a spinal board.

Does flail chest require surgery? ›

Multiple rib fractures exposes serious respiratory disorders and they are generally treated with non surgical methods. Nevertheless, in cases of long term pain despite medical treatment, parenchymal injury, hematoma, posture disorder and flail chest, surgery is needed.

How does flail chest affect breathing? ›

A flail segment of the chest wall will negatively affect respiration in three ways: ineffective ventilation, pulmonary contusion, and hypoventilation with atelectasis. There is ineffective ventilation because of increased dead space, decreased intrathoracic pressure, and increased oxygen demand from injured tissue.

What are 3 types of chest injuries? ›

Types of chest injuries according to their location
  • Contusions or bruises.
  • Rib fractures.
  • Flail chest.
  • Esternal and scapula fractures.
  • Clavicle fractures.

How do you manage a chest injury? ›

Chest Injury Treatment
  1. Call 911.
  2. Begin CPR, if Necessary.
  3. Cover an Open Wound.
  4. Stop Bleeding, if Necessary.
  5. Position Person to Make Breathing Easier.
  6. Monitor Breathing.
  7. Follow Up.
9 Sept 2021

Which signs and symptoms indicate that a patient has flail chest? ›

What are the symptoms?
  • extreme pain in your chest.
  • tenderness in the area of your chest where the bone has come away.
  • significant difficulty in breathing.
  • bruising and inflammation.
  • uneven rising or falling of your chest when breathing.
3 Oct 2017

What are 10 common signs and symptoms of chest injury? ›

Signs and symptoms of chest injury include:
  • pain in the chest that gets worse when laughing, coughing or sneezing.
  • pain when breathing in.
  • difficulty breathing.
  • tenderness to the chest or back over the ribs.
  • bruising.
  • swelling.
  • a 'crunchy' or 'crackling' feeling under the skin or in the ribs.
  • coughing up blood.
19 Dec 2017

Which of the following is an accurate definition of a flail chest? ›

Flail chest is defined radiographically as 3 or more consecutive ribs fractured in 2 or more places. This often translates to a clinical flail which is associated with paradoxical chest wall movement during respiratory cycles.

What type of injury is likely to produce a flail segment? ›

The most common cause of flail chest is blunt chest trauma. Flail chest is most commonly seen after automobile accidents and falls, although it may also develop after aggressive cardiopulmonary resuscitation or in patients with pathologic rib fractures.

What are the complications of flail chest? ›

Pulmonary complications due to flail chest include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, pneumonia and atelectasis [4,6,9]. Although the incidence of hemo- or/and pneumothorax is often mentioned its effects on outcome are seldom noted.

What are the two main treatments for the management of all flail chest wounds? ›

Treatment of Flail Chest

Humidified oxygen is given to patients with flail chest. Analgesics may help improve ventilation by decreasing pain during breathing, but ventilation may need to be supported mechanically.

Is flail chest painful? ›

It's very painful. Flail chest is a traumatic disorder that happens when three or more ribs located next to each other are fractured in two or more places. This causes your chest wall to become unstable, interfering with breathing. The fractures cause your ribs and chest wall to malfunction in the ways they move.

What is the prognosis for flail chest? ›

Overall, patients with flail chest have a 5-10% reported mortality if they reach the hospital alive. Patients who do not need mechanical ventilation do better statistically, and overall mortality seems to increase with increasing injury severity scores (ISS), age, and number of total rib fractures.

Can CPR cause flail chest? ›

Rib fractures, sternal fractures, and flail chest occur commonly as a result of chest compressions during CPR.

What are 4 common causes of chest injury? ›

Car crashes, falls, getting punched, and injury from bicycle handlebars are common causes of chest contusions. A very forceful blow to the chest can injure the heart or blood vessels in the chest, the lungs, the airway, the liver, or the spleen.

What is major chest injury? ›

Chest wall and pulmonary injuries range from rib fractures to flail chest, pneumothorax to hemothorax and pulmonary contusion to tracheobronchial injuries. Following these injuries, patients may present with a simple dyspnea or even respiratory arrest.

What are the two types of chest trauma? ›

Chest trauma can be penetrating or blunt. If the injury pokes through the skin (stabbing, gunshot wound, an arrow through the heart, etc.) we call it penetrating chest trauma. If a sharp object tearing deep into skin and muscle isn't the main cause of tissue damage, consider it blunt chest trauma.

How do you wrap a chest injury? ›

Place tape, plastic, or a chest seal over any hole that's sucking in air, including entry and exit wounds. Make sure no air enters any wound. Secure the tape or seal with occlusive dressingor similar wrapping material that can create a water and airtight seal.

What are 4 signs of a serious chest injury? ›

Symptoms of Chest Injuries

The chest may be bruised. Sometimes people are short of breath. If the injury is severe, they may feel very short of breath, drowsy, or confused, and the skin may be cold, sweaty, or blue. Such symptoms may develop when the lungs malfunction severely (respiratory failure.

What are the complications of chest injury? ›

Although there are a wide range of complications following thoracic trauma, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and pleural sepsis are the most common potentially preventable problems. Respiratory failure and pneumonia are directly related to the severity of the injury and the age and condition of the patient.

What is the priority nursing intervention for a patient with chest trauma that is suspected of having a pneumothorax? ›

The priority is to maintain the airway, breathing, and circulation. The most important interventions focus on reinflating the lung by evacuating the pleural air. Patients with a primary spontaneous pneumothorax that is small with minimal symptoms may have spontaneous sealing and lung re-expansion.

Why does flail chest cause paradoxical breathing? ›

In a flail chest, the fractures on adjacent ribs separate them from the rest of the chest wall. As a result, paradoxical motion of the ribs occurs. For example, the affected area may move inward (sucked in by the negative pressure change in the thoracic cavity) while the rest of the chest wall moves outward.

How do you know if a hit to the chest is serious? ›

Serious chest injury

Pain or difficulty breathing that starts immediately after an injury may mean that organs inside the chest, such as the lungs, heart, or blood vessels, have been damaged. Other symptoms often develop quickly, such as severe shortness of breath or signs of shock.

Which type of trauma injury accounts for the most deaths? ›

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is the single largest cause of death from injury in the United States: 1,000,000 people with TBI per year in US: 230,00 hospitalized. 50,000 die (one third of all trauma deaths)

What are the two most common injuries caused by penetrating chest trauma quizlet? ›

Open pneumothorax and cardiac tamponade are the two common injuries caused by penetrating chest trauma.

Which assessment findings are most consistent with flail chest? ›

A computed tomography (CT) scan is the preferred test for identifying flail chest, as an X-ray may not identify all rib fractures. If a CT scan alone or in combination with an X-ray finds at least three ribs broke in two places, flail chest will be diagnosed.

What is the pathophysiology of flail chest? ›

(A) Flail chest occurs when multiple rib fractures result in a loss of stability of the chest wall. The loss of continuity with the remainder of the rib cage causes the flail segment to move paradoxically. (B) Pressure within the chest is negative during inspiration, causing the flail segment to retract.

What happens when the area over a flail chest injury moves in a direction opposite to that of the rest of the chest wall during breathing? ›

The flail segment moves in the opposite direction to the rest of the chest wall: because of the ambient pressure in comparison to the pressure inside the lungs, it goes in while the rest of the chest is moving out, and vice versa.
...
Flail chest
SpecialtyEmergency medicine
2 more rows

What is the most common site of injury from blunt chest trauma? ›

Ribs. Rib fractures are the most common injury in blunt chest trauma, occurring in 50% of cases. A single rib fracture is usually not clinically significant, whereas multiple rib fractures indicate severe injury.

What would be your priority intervention for a patient with chest trauma Blunt )? ›

Rapid mobilisation through physiotherapy is considered a key factor in preventing complications, including pneumonia, respiratory failure and ARDS [65]. However to facilitate these interventions, effective pain control is necessary to allow for deep breathing chest physiotherapy and improved lung function [66].

What is the first aid treatment for a flail chest? ›

How to Treat:
  1. Stabilize the flail chest.
  2. Use a hard pad to put pressure on the flail segment. Holding the flail segment in place keeps it from moving in an opposite direction as the surrounding muscle and bone. ...
  3. This injury requires emergency medical treatment.

What is stove in chest? ›

The stove-in chest is a rare form of flail chest in which there is collapse of a segment of the chest wall, associated with a high immediate mortality. A 65-year-old male pedestrian was admitted with severe chest pain and dyspnoea, after being struck by a car.

What is a flail chest and how do you treat it? ›

In severe cases, mechanical ventilation is used to help keep the chest cavity stable. Surgery is needed in some cases, such as where the lungs are punctured. In the past, the treatment of flail chest involved holding patients in position and using rods and braces to direct the affected area of chest outwards.

› health › flail-chest ›

When three or more ribs in a row have multiple fractures within each rib, it can cause a part of your chest wall to become separated and out of sync from the re...

Flail Chest: Symptoms & Treatment

https://study.com › academy › lesson › flail-chest-sympto...
https://study.com › academy › lesson › flail-chest-sympto...
Flail chest, typically a result of trauma to the chest wall, is a medical emergency. If not treated promptly it can lead to serious complications....
Your ribs are twelve pairs of bones that wrap from your spine around to the front of your chest. They create a cage that protects some of your most important or...

What would be effective treatment for a casualty with flail chest injury? ›

Isolated flail chest may be successfully managed with aggressive pulmonary toilet including facemask oxygen, CPAP, and chest physiotherapy. Adequate analgesia is of paramount importance in patient recovery and may contribute to the return of normal respiratory mechanics.

How is a flail chest repaired? ›

Mechanical ventilation to achieve chest cavity stabilization is the standard treatment for patients with both flail chest and lung damage. This treatment has a demonstrated ability to reduce mortality rates, but the possibility of developing pneumonia increases the longer it is in place.

What is the first aid management of abdominal injuries? ›

Assist the casualty into a ü comfortable position. Usually with the head raised slightly and the knees flexed will relieve the pressure or placed in the fetal position. Cover protruding intestines with plastic wrap, a non-stick dressing or if not available, a wet dressing could be used. Monitor vital signs.

Can CPR cause flail chest? ›

Rib fractures, sternal fractures, and flail chest occur commonly as a result of chest compressions during CPR.

Which of the following is an accurate definition of a flail chest? ›

Flail chest is defined radiographically as 3 or more consecutive ribs fractured in 2 or more places. This often translates to a clinical flail which is associated with paradoxical chest wall movement during respiratory cycles.

Which assessment findings are most consistent with flail chest? ›

A computed tomography (CT) scan is the preferred test for identifying flail chest, as an X-ray may not identify all rib fractures. If a CT scan alone or in combination with an X-ray finds at least three ribs broke in two places, flail chest will be diagnosed.

What is the most important step in caring for a person with an impaled object in their chest? ›

Soft Tissue Injuries (Continued)

In the case of impaled objects, it is important to remember not to extract the object and to immobilize the object so that it will not cause further damage. pressure dressing or tourniquet. Prevent contamination with a sterile dressing. wound should be your principal concern.

What are the complications of flail chest? ›

Pulmonary complications due to flail chest include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, pneumonia and atelectasis [4,6,9]. Although the incidence of hemo- or/and pneumothorax is often mentioned its effects on outcome are seldom noted.

What are 10 common signs and symptoms of chest injury? ›

Signs and symptoms of chest injury include:
  • pain in the chest that gets worse when laughing, coughing or sneezing.
  • pain when breathing in.
  • difficulty breathing.
  • tenderness to the chest or back over the ribs.
  • bruising.
  • swelling.
  • a 'crunchy' or 'crackling' feeling under the skin or in the ribs.
  • coughing up blood.
19 Dec 2017

How long does a chest wall injury take to heal? ›

Although chest wall injuries can be painful, you can expect this discomfort to improve over a period of three to six weeks. This may take longer for more severe injuries. Chest wall injuries are managed differently depending on the severity of your injuries and the symptoms you are experiencing.

What is the most comfortable position for a patient with abdominal pain? ›

Assist the patient to lie down in a position of greatest comfort, usually on the back or on the uninjured side, with both knees drawn up for relief of pain and spasm.

What is the recovery position used for? ›

If a person is unconscious but is breathing and has no other life-threatening conditions, they should be placed in the recovery position. Putting someone in the recovery position will keep their airway clear and open. It also ensures that any vomit or fluid won't cause them to choke.

What is the main care and treatment for a person with a fracture? ›

use broad bandages (where possible) to prevent movement at joints above and below the fracture. support the limb, carefully passing bandages under the natural hollows of the body. place a padded splint along the injured limb. place padding between the splint and the natural contours of the body and secure firmly.

What can be used to stabilize fractured ribs? ›

For surgical stabilization of rib fractures, we currently prefer precontoured side and rib-specific plates with threaded holes and self-tapping locking screws. Polymer cable cerclage is used to enhance plating of longitudinal fractures, rib fractures near the spine, osteoporotic ribs, and injuries of rib cartilage.

How long does it take ribs to heal after CPR? ›

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE RIBS TO HEAL AFTER CPR? Every patient is different and healing times vary, but generally fractured ribs and cracked sternums take around 4-6 weeks to fully heal.

What causes hypotension in flail chest? ›

In severe cases of flail chest, individuals can experience shortness of breath, cyanosis, or refractory hypoxemia. They may also develop hemodynamic instability and unstable blood pressure, which can cause arrhythmias, hypotension, or tachycardia.

Videos

1. Surgery Flail Chest Paradoxical Breathing Seagull plate Rib fracture Pneumatic fixation Stove
(MBBS VPASS)
2. Management of Rib Fracture and Flail Chest.
(surgery education)
3. Trauma of the Chest and Lungs: Rib fracture, Flail Chest and Pulmonary Contusion
(VSU-CoN Medical Surgical Nursing)
4. Trauma 4, Chest injuries and pneumothorax
(Dr. John Campbell)
5. Flail Chest (Medical Definition) | Chest Trauma
(Respiratory Therapy Zone)
6. Chest Trauma (Part 1) - CRASH! Medical Review Series
(Paul Bolin, M.D.)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Greg O'Connell

Last Updated: 01/12/2023

Views: 5777

Rating: 4.1 / 5 (42 voted)

Reviews: 81% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Greg O'Connell

Birthday: 1992-01-10

Address: Suite 517 2436 Jefferey Pass, Shanitaside, UT 27519

Phone: +2614651609714

Job: Education Developer

Hobby: Cooking, Gambling, Pottery, Shooting, Baseball, Singing, Snowboarding

Introduction: My name is Greg O'Connell, I am a delightful, colorful, talented, kind, lively, modern, tender person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.